Total Pageviews

Battle of Aliwal 1846

Battle of Aliwal 1846
By Michael Perry

Sunday, 28 July 2013

Sigismondo Pandolfo Malatesta

Hi gents,


Here we have via Wikipedia Sigismondo Pandolfo Malatesta  
popularly known as the Wolf of Rimini, he was an Italian condottieri and nobleman, a member of the House of Malatesta and lord of Rimini, Fano, and Cesenaa from 1432. He was widely considered by his contemporaries as one of the most daring military leaders in Italy and commanded the Venetian forces in the 1465 campaign against the Ottoman Empire.

The Flags are by Pete's flags http://www.freewebstore.org/Petesflags
Following the family's tradition, Sigismondo after the death of his father debuted as man-at-arms at the age of 13 against his relative Carlo II Malatesta, lord of Pesaro and Pope Martin V's ally, who aimed to annex Rimini, Cesena and Fano to his territories. After his victory, Sigismondo obtained, together with his brothers Galeotto Roberto and Domenico, the title of Papal vicar for those cities. In 1431, albeit with inferior forces, he repelled another invasion by the Malatestas of Pesaro. When, soon afterwards, his elder brother abdicated, he became lord of Rimini, at the age of 15.


After 1449 Malatesta served variously under Venice, Florence, Siena, Naples and Sforza who he had battled with previously. The Peace of Lodi (1454), from which he was excluded, pushed the major Italian powers against him. His territories were repeatedly invaded by Aragonese, Venetian and Papal troops. In 1456 Sigismondo married Isotta degli Atti, his long-time mistress, and legitimized their three surviving children; the only son, Sallustio, was declared his heir. On 25 December 1460, a famous trial in absentia was held in Rome against Sigismondo. Pope Pius II, who considered him guilty of treachery towards Siena arising from his long-running feud with Federico da Montefeltro, Duke of Urbino, excommunicated him, declaring him a heretic and attributing to Sigismondo a series of sins (incest, sodomy against his son Roberto and others) which smeared his reputation for centuries. In a unique ceremony, he was canonized into Hell with the curse, "No mortal heretofore has descended into Hell with the ceremony of canonization. Sigi shall be the first deemed worthy of such honour." Quite an achievement!


Malatesta's image was publicly burnt in Rome, and a de facto crusade was then launched against him, in a league including the pope, the king of Naples, the Duke of Milan and Federico da Montefetro not a popular man at this time. He defeated the first contingent of Papal troops, led by Napoleone Orsini, on 2 July 1461 at Castelleone di Suasa. In 1462 he was able to take Senigallia, but was forced to flee to Fano after the arrival of Federico da Montefeltro. The latter followed and severely crushed him on 12 August 1462 near Senigallia at the mouth of the Cesena. The war ended in 1463, due to the intervention of Venice, with the loss of all Sigismondo's territories apart from Rimini and a territory of some 8 kilometres around it: both, however, were assigned to return to the Papal States after his death. He then sought greater fortune as a general for Venice in its war against the Ottomans, as a field commander in the Peloponnesus (1464–1466).

The Venetians granted him a contingent of 150 men to defend Rimini and his other lands during his absence in the Morea. The first war , lasting from 1463 to 1479, saw much fighting in the Morea.
.
 After returning from the Morea Sigismondo appears to have intended to murder Pius' successor, Pope Paul II (who had asked him to exchange Rimini for Spoleto and Camerino), in 1468, but he lost his nerve and returned to Rimini. He died in his residence of Castel Sismondo a few months later, I am sure you will agree a very interesting chap!
I still have nearly all this collection to base I still can't decide on which is the best way to do it so some serious thinking ahead!
Thanks for stopping by
Willie

 

12 comments:

  1. Wonderful figures as always, and what an interesting character Sismondo was. Dean

    ReplyDelete
  2. That's it then. Modest order on the way to Perry & Co. If I end up in a funk over too many projects on the go, it's your fault!

    ReplyDelete
  3. As ever cracking figures so very well painted

    Ian

    ReplyDelete
  4. A wonderful and very colourful collection Willie.
    Cheers,
    Pat.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Fantastic stuff, I love the mix of figures, really great feel to the collection.

    ReplyDelete
  6. This is such a colorful period, brilliantly done!! Well done.

    Frank
    http://adventuresinlead.blogspot.com.au/

    ReplyDelete
  7. Fantastic figures, banners and photos!

    ReplyDelete
  8. Stunning work !!!

    best regards Michael

    ReplyDelete
  9. So much color and character here. Wonderful set!

    ReplyDelete
  10. this collection's looking pretty impressive

    ReplyDelete
  11. Fantastic, colors are really impressive!

    ReplyDelete